How to: The “Time and Room” Shot

We’ve all seen it, maybe even done it.  Your defender is late with the slide.  You crank back and let it fly, the ball skims the goalie’s ear and slides just under the pipe, that crazy equalizer goal.  These are the types of goals that change the entire momentum of a game and get us amped.  There’s an entire science behind the shot.

When watching someone take the shot, it looks like it’s all in the arms.  However, your entire body needs to work together in order to execute the Time and Room shot and put one in the back of the net when you need it the most.  Here are some tips on how to make that happen.

Footwork.  The shot, not surprisingly, begins with your feet.  Your feet should never be planted taking this type of shot.  You’re trying to rip it, aren’t you?  Performing a crow-hop (dropping one foot behind the other) will allow you to generate power and get your entire body behind the shot.  During the follow through, make your back leg follow your stick.  It will help you snap your hips and use your back to get even more power.

Utilize your Core.  Put your back into it!  Your core is crucial during an outside shot.  Here’s how to build momentum: try to lean back a little during your wind-up and launch forward during the follow through.  It’s key to also keep your arms out and off your body.

B.E.E.F.  You’ve heard this before, haven’t you?  Let’s review.

Balance.  Stabilize yourself by aligning your shoulders with your hips.  You’ll stay upright if you get hit during the shot and will also help generate power.

Eyes.  You can’t just blindly rip it without a target.  Improve your accuracy by looking for openings around the goalie’s body.  You can never go wrong placing a nice shot on the offside hip.

Elbows.  Like I said, keep those arms away from your body.  This will help with power, accuracy, and doing so actually makes it harder for a goalie to read.  While winding up, try and get your stick behind your helmet to interrupt the goalie tracking the ball. The legend himself Gary Gait says butt-control is a key element in any shot.  Point the butt-end where you want the shot to go.

Follow Through.  Yes, the fun part!  Keep both hands on your stick, arms off the body, put your back into it, snap your wrists and let the rest of your body follow with the momentum.  If you aren’t almost backwards after the release, you aren’t doing it right.

This type of shot can take some practice, but is a MUST to have in your arsenal.  Your team will thank you for it.

Who do you think has the best “Time and Room” shot in the game?  Click the title to comment.

From humble beginnings in upstate New York, Nicole spent her childhood in her driveway with a stick in hand learning how to catch and throw a lacrosse ball. Her hard work and love for the game landed her at Hamilton College where she currently plays for a nationally ranked Division III Women’s Lacrosse program, coached by Patty Kloidt. Nicole hopes to instill her lax-addiction in young athletes and inspire them to pursue their dream of playing college lacrosse.

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