DIII Recruiting with Nat St. Laurent of Ohio Northern

We spoke with head coach Nat St. Laurent of Ohio Northern, who affirmed that college is a 40 year, not a 4 year decision and to consider job placement rates alongside athletic facilities.

It is important to impress coaches with your abilities and your character. Coaches want to hear what your coaches, teachers and counselors have to say before inviting you into their locker room. As a player, this is a good thing as it means your teammates will be the kind of guys you’re proud to play alongside.

If you were a recruit right now, how would you approach the DIII recruiting scene?

I would take an honest and realistic approach to recruiting. Find a school that offers what I am looking to major in while in college. I would also try to make sure that school offers a few other majors I am interested just in case I change my mind. I also would look at the school academic reputation and placement rates. Playing lacrosse is great but you get 4 years. Your degree lasts a lifetime. I would also take a look at the overall success of the athletic department and be sure I take a long look at the facilities and the support the lacrosse program receives from the school. Finally, I would have to consider the cost of the education and the amount of possible academic merit money I would receive to help finance my education.

What’s the best way for players to get on your recruiting radar?

The best way recruits can get on our radar is to contact us and let us know they are interested. Be sure to have SAT and ACT scores, if they have been taken, and include their GPA. If they have game or a highlight film please include the link the email as well. Finally, they should email us their High School Coach and Travel/Club Coach (if they have one) contact information. We spend a lot of time talking with coaches and teachers that know the student-athlete. We like to make sure we are getting the high character person as well as the good lacrosse player.

What’s a question you wished recruits asked you more during the recruiting process?

How we monitor academic progress and balance academics with lacrosse our obligations.

What indications help you determine if a good high school player will be a great college player?

How hard they play when we watch them and if their coaches state that they are coachable. Having a tremendous work ethic and being motivated are key elements for student-athletes to have in order to be successful on and off the field.

What’s special about being a student-athlete at Ohio Northern?

Our student-athletes receive a Top 50 education in the country and get to play and practice in some of the best facilities in the all of college lacrosse regardless of level. It is a great balance of athletics and academics. We also have an outstanding job placement percentage academically and our athletic programs compete at a national level.

Inside Recruiting with Kyle Hofstaedter of Calvin College

We spoke with Calvin College head coach Kyle Hofstaedter and assistant Graham Bergsma about the DIII recruiting scene and how high school recruits should go about target these schools. DIII is a different game because without athletic scholarships to offer, college coaches do not face the same restrictions on communication with recruits. What that means is learn about the school and be proactive in telling the coach why you think it may be a great fit for you.

What advice do you have for players interested in playing DIII lacrosse?
Graham: Understand the differences between divisions. Unlike DI and DII, DIII schools cannot give athletic scholarships to their athletes, but that doesn’t mean they can’t end up giving you more money, or making your overall cost lower. DIII schools often have great academic or merit grants and scholarships. Calvin, for example, gives excellent aid to students with good academics. Also, recruits should be looking at the school as a whole instead of focusing only on its lacrosse program. Find a school that fits you best. That means academically, athletically, and overall atmosphere. You’re spending the next 4 years of your life there, so make sure it is a place you would enjoy being every day.

Kyle: My biggest piece of advice is to be proactive with phone calls and emails. And when you make contact be sure to be professional. This means following up to emails in a timely manner. Answering the same day shows you really care, but answering several days later can tell a coach you don’t really care too much.

What indications help you determine if a good high school player will be a great college player?
Graham: I like to look at the little things. Is he making the right play, hustling on a ride or going hard for a ground ball. It’s not always about scoring. Don’t get me wrong, goals are great though. One of the big things that stands out to me is a smart player. If they are making the right decision, whether that be making the next pass, or making a hard aggressive move to the net and scoring. Recruits often make the mistake of either being a ball hog, or of passing too much. Making the right play for the situation is key. If the best play is to get underneath your defender and bury one… then do that. Holding onto the ball in a triple team however, is not often the best choice.

Kyle: Outside of game film I look for a certain level of professionalism. A recruit that holds himself to a higher standard is going to excel in a more demanding, rigorous college environment.

What’s a question you wished players asked you more during the recruiting process?
Graham: It really depends. Focus on learning more about the school or program at a deeper level. Just don’t ask questions that you can easily google to find the answer.

Kyle: When I’m meeting with a recruit I try to understand why they want to be at Calvin. What makes the program so special to them? You can always be honest. “Hey Coach, I never really heard of your school until I looked into your program recently. I’m also very interested in your engineering program.”

Graham: Show through your answers and overall demeanor that this isn’t a routine recruiting visit. It all comes down to your level of dedication. Don’t make a decision and regret it later because you didn’t ask the right questions and get enough information. Be able to ask the hard questions.

Great, thanks coaches, any final thoughts?

Graham: We can’t stress it enough, be professional and be timely with your communication. If you get an email from a coach and don’t have time to really respond at least let them know you got their message. “Hey Coach, I’m in class, I’ll get back to you later tonight.” I understand players might be intimidated by coaches sometimes, but trust me. Responding professionally will mean as much to a coach as your play on the field. It tells us something about who you are as a person, and a good coach recruits good people, not just great lacrosse players.

Kyle: Don’t string coaches along. Coaches and players don’t like to be mislead. It’s funny, the top recruits that are going to big time programs like Princeton or Hopkins actually follow up more often with me than any other recruits. Those guys are going to top tier programs because they can do the little things right consistently.

Recruiting Insight: Head Coach Dan Sharbaugh of Centre College

Dan Sharbaugh comes to Centre from Gettysburg where served as the team’s offensive coordinator while handling recruiting, scouting, film breakdown, and overseeing academic programs. Sharbaugh also held coaching positions at York College and Eastern University, where he was also a four-year starter and two-year team captain during his playing career.

What advice do you have for players interested in playing DIII lacrosse?

Just do your research because there are so many schools out there. My first thought after considering the coaching job here at Centre was the location. I couldn’t have predicted I would live and coach in Kentucky. Ultimately, it’s about fit and how you feel when you visit a school. You just have to give each school an honest chance when weighing your options.

What’s a question you wished players asked you more during the recruiting process?

Ask about a coach’s philosophy or his brand of lacrosse. This type of question helps you understand the system and how the program works. Players need to look past the scheduling and not focus so much on records from previous seasons. A midfielder who thrives in transition won’t do as well in a slow, patient offense, for example. When a player understands the X’s and O’s of a program they get a sense for how well they will fit in with the program.

What indications help you determine if a good high school player will be a great college player?

When I meet with recruits I tend to talk a lot about the commitment level. I emphasize our team’s commitment to lifting, running, practice etc. I can generally gauge a recruit’s level of commitment by their body language and how they carry themselves throughout our conversation.

Other indications of a quality recruit such as stick skills are more obvious to assess.

What’s special about being a student-athlete at Centre?

The kind of kids that are attracted to Centre are pretty driven individuals. We have tough admissions standards. In addition to the classroom these guys are committing to play a college sport. These kids are driven in multiple aspects of life. They really don’t plan on going to the MLL and know they need to focus on a career outside of lacrosse as well.

How has the accelerated recruiting process impacted your approach to recruiting?

It’s a challenge right now because I just got to Centre in August. The accelerated process is nice for DIII overall because coaches can recruit the late bloomers who missed out on committing early to DI schools.

Can you tell us about your experience going through the recruiting process? What mishaps or challenges did you face and how did you deal with them?

I looked at a bunch of schools and targeted the ones where I really gelled with the coach. Honesty was big for me. There are the coaches who stroke recruits’ egos and don’t necessarily give the full picture. The transition from high school to college runs smoothly when a coaching staff can be honest with a recruit and set real expectations about life in the classroom and on the field.

Great, thanks Coach Sharbaugh. Any final thoughts?

Make the decision that’s best for you, when it’s best for you. So if a coach tells you they need an answer by the end of the week, but you don’t feel comfortable making the decision until the following week then just take your time. Choose the school you really enjoy. Chances are you have a good shot at walking on to the team if the coach already recruited you.

ConnectLAX is a third party recruiting service and not affiliated with or endorsed by Centre College or Dan Sharbaugh.

Recruiting Insight: Roman Lao-Gosney of MLL’s Florida Launch

Growing up in Maine, Roman loved the game and worked diligently, passionately, and whole-heartedly to make it to where he is today. Roman was a co-captain at Lehigh University, played in the 2013 Champion Challenge for Team USA and currently plays in the MLL for the Florida Launch. His position as a midfielder makes him centered around dodging and shooting on the run, but he has been forced to become a more well-rounded player. Balancing his busy schedule, Roman also works with young lacrosse players on making them the best players they could be. See what he has to say about his own recruiting experience.

Where did you play college lacrosse and why did you choose that program?
I played college lacrosse at Lehigh University and I will always be a proud Mountain Hawk alumni. I chose Lehigh for two main reasons. One being the arrival of head coach Kevin Cassese and the uprise of the program. Coach Cassese’s passion and determination was immediately felt when being recruited by him and one thing that stuck over other coaches at other programs is he did not give me a strict timeline to commit. He genuinely wanted me to make the right decision for myself in terms of school and lacrosse. This leads me to the second main reason why I chose Lehigh. It is a smaller private school where I felt I wanted to be, regardless of whether or not I was playing lacrosse there.

What other colleges did you consider and what was the determining factor in your decision?
Some of the other colleges I considered and visited were Towson, Vermont, and Brown. The determining factors were that Lehigh was a great school, with a smaller, private school feel, and that the program really felt on the rise, namely due to the arrival of the new coaching staff.

Did you have any positive and negative surprises about the program once you were on campus?
There were not many surprises about the program as a whole when I first got to Lehigh. I feel like this is mostly because our coaching staff did (and does) a great job of shooting players straight. As players, we respect hearing the truth, whether it’s what we want to hear or not.
One thing that I did have to come to terms with over time, was that I couldn’t just show up and win a National Championship. I can honestly say that I felt I would win one before I graduated Lehigh, but after the first season, my mentality changed. It wasn’t that I had given up the dream, it was more about refining it. I became set on taking smaller steps toward program success and by my senior year, we won our first Patriot League Championship in a long time. I leave behind a legacy that will hopefully help the program to a National Championship.

How did being a collegiate student-athlete shape your college experience?
Being a college-athlete shaped my college experience greatly. My college schedule and lifestyle was literally based around school and lacrosse. Because of this, my social life was not as thrilling and packed as other student’s were. What my team and I were able to accomplish together, however, far outweighs the momentary pleasures of partying. I still take with me the mental strength that was necessary to compete and succeed as an athlete in college.

Given your recruiting experience, what advice or tips do you have for current recruits?
The advice I would give to current recruits is to pick a school that you see yourself going to whether or not lacrosse is in the picture. Injuries happen and passions change. You never know what can happen once you’re at a school, but what you can do for yourself is choose a school that fits your needs and feels right.
My advice for players who are trying to get recruited by better programs is to watch and learn from the best players on your team, on college teams, on MLL teams, and world teams. Watch players that have a similar game to your own, do what they do, and then make it better.

Recruiting Tips from Instructor Marcus Dent

Marcus Dent has been playing lacrosse his whole life, and can personally attest to the advantages the sport has brought him. After earning four letters in high school, Marcus went on to play in college, but his career was brought to an early close due to an injury. Afterwards, he took over the MCLA program at his university. Today, he continues to coach at DePaul University. Check out what Marcus has to say about his personal recruiting experience.

Where did you play college lacrosse and why did you choose that program?
I played college lacrosse for DePaul University’s MCLA club team my freshman year before hanging up the cleats due to concussion issues.

What other colleges did you consider and what was the determining factor in your decision?
I was talking to Lafayette University, Sacred Heart University, and Washington College before I decided to head to Chicago to play club ball. I would have loved to play Division I, but my family was new to the recruiting process while I was going through high school and we really didn’t reach out to coaches until the summer before my senior year, which I think held me back from getting recruited by better programs. The colleges I was talking to were either too close to home or not the right program fit for me, so I decided to focus on academics at DePaul.

Did you have any positive or negative surprises about the program once you were on campus?
There were definitely a lot of negative surprises when I first started playing at DePaul. In high school I played in a college-style system and played against some of the best competition in the country, and when I first experienced DePaul’s club team I thought it was a big step down; no coach, no fields to practice on, and a weak schedule. I suffered a concussion at the end of my season, which sidelined me forever. I still loved the sport and saw a lot of potential in DePaul’s program so I convinced the seniors on the team to let me coach. Over the course of three seasons I helped take the team from a 2-5 record (my freshman year 2010) to a 9-2 team in 2014. We actually won our conference (the GRLC) in 2013 and received our first ever national tournament berth, which was an incredible feeling. I have since had to back out of my coaching role at DePaul so that I can work full-time, but it is a long-term goal of mine to convince the athletic department at DePaul to fund a Division I lacrosse team because it is disgraceful that Notre Dame and Marquette are the “faces” of men’s lacrosse in Chicago.

How did being a collegiate student-athlete shape your college experience?
Being a collegiate student-athlete helped me to be more of a goal-oriented person as I progressed through school. It also introduced me to some of my best friends and helped be develop an invaluable network of friends and professionals that I will keep in contact with for the rest of my life.

Given your recruiting experience, what advice or tips do you have for current recruits?
Don’t make the same mistake I did, start as early as possible. Expose yourself to as many camps and tournaments as possible and don’t be afraid to be assertive during the process. Stay focused on becoming the best TEAM player you possibly can because that is the type of player coaches are looking for in the end. Hit the wall.

Recruiting Advice from Instructor Sam Talkow

Sam continues to be dedicated and work his hardest at improving his strengths and weaknesses, on and off the field. He has had the opportunity to play for team Israel in the 2014 World Championships and also works individually with players by personalizing his sessions towards the needs of the athlete. Check out what he has to say about his recruiting experience.

Where do you play college lacrosse and why did you choose that program?
Boston University. I chose BU because academically it has a great undergraduate business school as well as a new d1 program in which I saw a great opportunity help build and become a part of.

What other colleges did you consider and what was the determining factor in your decision?
I considered Tufts, Air Force, and Duke. I really liked that BU was in a major city (Boston) as well as the undergraduate business school, on top of that with the opportunity to be part of the inaugural class it was hard to pass the opportunity.

Did you have any positive or negative surprises about the program once you were on campus?
The team cohesion and respect between one another was amazing. I went into it thinking that mostly freshman the experience and respect of one another would be somewhat lacking but it did not we had a great group of guys this year.

How did being a collegiate student-athlete shape your college experience?
It’s definitely a lot more work than just going to school, you do have to sacrifice much of your social life, but it also brings a tremendous bonus that is the friends and experiences that not many people have.

Given your recruiting experience, what advice or tips do you have for current recruits?
My advice would be to just have fun with it; the more you stress and worry the more it will show in your game, if you just go out there every time. Play your hardest and have fun… good things will come.

Recruiting Insight: Josh Lambert of Otterbein Univ.

Josh is a first-year graduate assistant for the men’s lacrosse program at Ottberbein University.

Josh was a four-year letterman at Wheeling Jesuit University in Wheeling, W.V. He served as a faceoff specialist and defensive middie in college, compiling a .683 faceoff percentage and snagging 368 ground balls over his four seasons. In addition, he tallied nine goals and dished out 15 assists.

A 2009 graduate of nearby Hilliard Davidson High School, Josh earned his bachelor’s degree in Business Administration at Wheeling and will be working towards his master’s of business while at Otterbein. He hopes to ultimately enter into coaching at the college level or begin a career in the marketing field.

If you were a recruit right now how would you approach the DIII recruiting scene?

I would be open and willing to take as many visits as possible. It’s important to experience a lot of different college environments. There are no athletic scholarships involved in DIII and no fixed timeline for making a decision. So, I would take my time and explore every option. I would not feel rushed.

When looking at a lacrosse program it’s also important to understand the head coach. Is he a player’s coach or a performance coach? A player’s coach focuses on the all-around experience of his players. He looks to help or get involved in the classroom while making sure players excel on the field. A performance coach focuses mostly on the athletic development of his players. It depends what experience a student-athlete is looking for. It’s super important to understand the makeup of a lacrosse team as well.

What’s the best way for players to get on your recruiting radar?

Go to as many lacrosse events and recruiting functions as possible. Be sure to meet your target coaches and ask them questions.

Each school probably has a recruiting questionnaire on their website. Fill this out. It puts you directly into the recruit database. Then the coaching staff can start evaluating you.

What’s a question you wished recruits asked you more during the recruiting process?

Well, we generally ask recruits what they want to accomplish in five years and where they want to be. Most of the prospective recruits are seniors, so we choose five years because they’ll be seniors in college by that time. This helps us understand what a recruit wants to accomplish in their time at college.

Recruits should also ask the coaching staff where they will be in five years. This helps the recruits understand a particular coach’s commitment level. Head Coach Colin Hartnett was a DIII player, for instance. He coaches a DIII program now. He is a fixture in our program and will continue to be for a while.

For some young coaches, their current job may be a stepping stone to a top assistant role or even a head coaching job somewhere else. There’s nothing wrong with that, but as a recruit it’s important to know.

What indications help you determine if a good high school player will be a great college player?

First we watch the recruit’s highlight tape to see how skilled they are.

Then, in our initial meeting with the recruit we look for the intangibles. These attributes are evident in conversation. We can get a sense for a young player’s character and his interest in the program, for example.

What’s special about being a student-athlete at Otterbein?

Our location is great. We’re 10 minutes from downtown Columbus. This means players can get great internships when they’re not playing lacrosse. We also have top-notch facilities including a brand new astro turf field and a new state-of-the-art weight room.

The coaching staff is really special here. Each coach has a second responsibility. For example, Coach Hartnett helps market all the fall sporting events whether it’s through word-of-mouth or posting bulletins around campus. Our players also have interactions with other varsity coaches as well. The head volleyball coach advises our Student Athlete Advisory Council. The soccer coaches let our guys shag balls during the fall. It’s awesome how our players get to interact with coaches from other teams.

ConnectLAX is a third party recruiting service and not affiliated with or endorsed by Otterbein University or Josh Lambert.

 

Recruiting Advice from Instructor Mike Ruggerio

Mike began playing lacrosse when he was 11, and immediately fell in love with the game. In high school, he was not only a starter on his varsity team, but he became captain his senior year. After high school, he was recruited, and to this day continues to play college lacrosse. Mike is currently majoring in history and plans to go on to graduate school to continue his history degree. Check out what he has to say about his recruiting experience.

Where do you play college lacrosse and why did you choose that program?
Actually, I played at three different schools. Out of high school I got recruited to a D2 school in NC, Catawba College, and there were some transfer issues. I ended up red shirting it during my time there. It definitely wasn’t my first choice and it didn’t end up working out. I ended up going to junior college in PA for two years, and I didn’t like that too much. I didn’t look into junior college too well, but they had offered me money.
Now I play at Castleton State College, in Vermont. I love it. It actually was my number one choice out of high school, but money was tight at the time. It seemed like fate that I got a second opportunity this time around.

What other colleges did you consider and what was the determining factor in your decision?
I looked at Castleton and Catawba, and then I also Plymouth State and Southern Maine. Unfortunately, when it came down to it, the deciding factor ended up being where I got a scholarship.

Did you have any positive or negative surprises about the program once you were on campus?
Well, at Catawba I was surprised at cliquey the team was there. That could have been, and was probably just the year I was there, but it didn’t seem like a very big family atmosphere. Once I came to Castleton, however, everyone acted like family. The coaching style was different and everyone treated each other differently. We would hangout on and off the field. It became more of a second home, and it was exactly what I needed.

How did being a collegiate student-athlete shape your college experience?
Personally, being a student-athlete keeps me motivated and driven to make sure I do well on and off the field. In high school I struggled with keeping my grades up, but now that is such a larger factor in college and it is a direct correlation to my time on the field.. If I want to get playing time, I have to show I am serious in my academic life.

Given your recruiting experience, what advice or tips do you have for current recruits?
My advice for students going through the recruiting process would be that it is important to not just go with the money. Just because the school is throwing money at you doesn’t mean it is going to be the best fit. It is imperative to visit every school and see what the atmosphere is going to be when the kids are hanging out, especially away from the coaches.

Recruiting Insight: Navy’s Ryan Wellner

Recruits need to continuously elevate their game on the field and in the classroom. College coaches quickly recognize this drive and intensity within recruits and know it’s a crucial trait to succeed at the next level.

We spoke with Ryan Wellner of the Naval Academy about how recruits can stand out from the crowded recruiting landscape. Coach Wellner is in his third season at the Naval Academy where he works closely with Navy’s defense and also the faceoff unit. Last spring, the Midshipmen finished No. 2 in the country in caused turnovers, averaging 10 per game thanks to a strong defensive unit.

What advice do you have for players interested in Division I schools?

Players who are seriously interested in playing Division I lacrosse need to identify the type of school they are looking for. Whether it is location, size, academic rigors, go through all the necessary steps to ensure a confident decision. Continue reading…

Recruiting Tips from Instructor Andrew Evans

Growing up in a lacrosse family, Andrew was no stranger to the game. He had played throughout his childhood on his father’s teams, and then continued to play at Salisbury School in CT, where he played at the highest level in New England Prep Schools. He was able to experience two New England Championships during his time there. Because of his experience as an attackman, Andrew thrives in his extensive training in the area, but he also excels as a goalie specialist. Check out what he has to say about his recruiting story.

Where did you play college lacrosse and why did you choose that program?
I played college lacrosse at Roanoke College in Salem VA. The reason I chose the program was because of the relationship I had with Coach Pilat. I had worked for him in the summers while in high school. At his goalie and defense camps I worked as a shooter and dodger. The experience not only introduced me to other players that were already playing at Roanoke but helped my shooting and dodging skills. As a result Coach Pilat watched me develop in person throughout high school rather than just seeing game film or a few regular season or recruiting camp games. Not only that several other teammates from Salisbury School and other players from my league decided to play at Roanoke so I knew what I was getting involved with.

What other colleges did you consider and what was the determining factor in your decision?
I also considered Hobart as my high school coach played there and several of my teammates made the decision to play there. The determining factor in my decision came down to playing for a top D3 team vs. a middle of the road D1 team. I wanted to compete in the NCAA tournament and I also felt that D3 was a better fit for my size and style of play. My relationship with Coach Pilat at Roanoke was another determining factor. I also wanted to move further south to get away from the frigid New England winter.

Did you have any positive or negative surprises about the program once you were on campus?
There were both positives and negatives of playing for a top level D3 team. One great surprise was how tight knit the team was. I already was introduced to other recruits and upperclassmen on the team so when my first semester started it was easy to adjust and I had a great base of friends before I even stepped foot on campus. One negative surprise was the number of recruits that were brought in every year. You don’t realize how competitive it is to hold a spot on the team and to get quality game time until you are in fall ball. This is both a positive and negative. It helped me grow as a competitor and player and kept the team playing at the top level. As a result we had a great deal of success both in the ODAC and NCAA D3.

How did being a collegiate student-athlete shape your college experience?
Being a student athlete helped shape my collegiate career by forcing me to focus on priorities. There wasn’t enough time in the day to be able to lose focus of academics while playing lacrosse. It forced me to study hard and to think about life after college lacrosse. It guided me to pursue a degree that I could use to find a great job after graduation and to build a career outside of playing lacrosse. Plenty of NCAA student athletes continue playing after graduation and a few actually make careers of it. But the vast majority of NCAA student athletes have amazing success in there careers outside of lacrosse whether they continue playing after graduation or not. Without the discipline taught on the lacrosse field I wouldn’t have had a foundation to fall back on when things got tough academically at Roanoke and in my professional career after Roanoke.

Given your recruiting experience, what advice or tips do you have for current recruits?
My advice for current recruits would be to work hard academically, focus on fundamental skills on the field, and to keep an open mind about different programs. Academics while they may not be directly related to your skill on the field can certainly be a barrier to entry if they are not a priority. You have to be on top of your grades before you can ever get recruited. Secondly, focusing on the fundamental skills will get you to the next level in lacrosse. College coaches are not looking for the fanciest and flashiest players. They want solid athletes that have the foundation built already and that they can coach into their system. If you are coachable and can show a coach your ability to develop as an athlete that will go a lot further than a highlight real. With that being said you have to build solid relationships with coaches. The more you have a chance to talk to them and build relationships the more likely they are going to think of you when recruiting season comes around. Lastly there are so many great schools out there that offer amazing education opportunities as well as the opportunity to play lacrosse. You don’t have to play at Hopkins or UVA although if you have the opportunity go for it! Just keep in mind that the landscape of NCAA lacrosse is changing not only at the top levels in D1 but also in D2 and D3. There will be more and more great teams breaking in to the top ten at all levels. The days of NCAA lacrosse being dominated by a handful of teams are numbered. So that opportunity to win a championship or be an All America can come from a variety of different schools. At the end of the day it is all about finding the right fit and not chasing after a specific team at a specific school. Also keep in mind what you want to study. Don’t pick a school purely for lacrosse and then realize that what you want to study would have been better offered somewhere else. The great thing about Roanoke was that beyond lacrosse I was able to get a degree in Finance. That truly has had a much broader impact on my life and career than where I played lacrosse.